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Installing Exchange Server 2010: The Typical Server

A Typical Exchange Server 2010 is one that runs the Client Access, Hub Transport, and Mailbox server roles.  This is the type of installation that would be performed in a single server organization.

There are two methods for performing the installation – command-line, or GUI.

Before beginning the installation make sure you have:

Installing a Typical Server in Command-Line Mode

Launch an elevated Command Prompt and run Exchange Server setup with the following parameters.  Note that the /LegacyRoutingServer parameter is only required if you have an existing Exchange 2003 server in the organization.  Replace “exch2003.contoso.local” below with the name of your existing Exchange Server 2003 server.

What did we just do?  We ran the setup command with the following parameters:

  • /m:install – places setup in Install Mode
  • /r:h,c,m,t – installs the Hub Transport, Client Access, Mailbox, and Management Tools roles
  • /LegacyRoutingServer – tells setup to create a legacy Routing Group Connector to the specific Exchange 2003 server

Exchange Server 2010 setup will run in unattended mode.

Restart the server when unattended setup is complete.

Installing a Typical Server in Graphical Mode

From the location that you extracted the Exchange Server 2010 setup files launch the Setup.exe file.

Select Step 3: Choose Exchange language option, and choose to Install only languages from the DVD.

Select Step 4: Install Microsoft Exchange.

Step through the Exchange Server 2010 Setup wizard introduction, license agreement, and error reporting dialogs.

Choose “Typical Exchange Server Installation”.  You can also choose a different path for the program files if you want to install to a different volume.

I'm going to walk through configuring internet facing services in a later article, but you can enter a public name here at this stage if you want to.

If you are installing into an existing Exchange Organization with Exchange 2003 servers, at the Mail Flow Settings dialog click Browse and choose the existing Exchange Server 2003 server to be configured as a routing group partner.

The Customer Experience Improvement Program is optional.

When the Readiness Checks are successful you can proceed with the install.  Note: the Outlook 2003 free/busy warning is normal and does not prevent you from proceeding with the install.

Restart the server when setup has completed, and then run Windows Update to ensure that the latest updates are installed before proceeding further.

Paul is a Microsoft MVP for Office Servers and Services. He works as a consultant, writer, and trainer specializing in Office 365 and Exchange Server. Paul is a co-author of Office 365 for IT Pros and several other books, and is also a Pluralsight author.
Category: Exchange Server

4 comments

  1. Gregski says:

    Though I love your articles and am learning a lot from them, on this one I have to disagree. “A Typical Exchange Server 2010 is one that runs the Client Access, Hub Transport, and Mailbox server roles. This is the type of installation that would be performed in a single server organization.” A shop of say 25 or less people these days most likely will have a hosted email solution. And running a public facing CAS/HUB on the same box as your Mailboxes is just asking for trouble.

    • Hi Greg,

      “Typical…” is what it is called in the setup dialog. It is correct to say that a single server organization will perform a Typical server installation. They have to. I don’t know how you can disagree with that when it is a fact.

      There’s room for debate about whether a smaller environment these days will “most likely have a hosted email solution”. Cloud/hosted is good for some, not good for others. In my own experience I wouldn’t say either is “most likely” these days.

      But regardless, this article (which pre-dates the launch of Office 365 mind you) is about how to install a Typical Exchange 2010 server.

      I’m curious also how a single server deployment is “asking for trouble” so if you want to expand on that please feel free.

  2. Amir Elgondy says:

    Totally Agreed to “They have to. I don’t know how you can disagree with that when it is a fact.”

    Thanks Mr.Paul Cunningham

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